Mining Hall of Fame Members

Members by Induction Date
Thomas P. Aitken Arguably the most successful small scale mine developer during the Alaska-Yukon Gold Rush; worked both lodes and placers in Alaska and the Yukon.
Byron S. Bartholf Represents a large family group of at least nine that was instrumental in the development of the gold lodes of the Willow Creek mining district. Family discoveries include the Gold Bullion, Mabel, Gold Cord, and Lucky Shot deposits.
John Beaton Co-discovered the Iditarod district with William Dikeman.
Earl H. Beistline A mining educator at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks and a lifelong promoter of the mining industry in Alaska.
Rhinehart M. "Rhiny" Berg He discovered the important Bornite copper-cobalt deposit in the Brooks Range.
Clarence Berry Prominent Klondike and Interior Alaska miner
Stephen Birch Founder and developer of Kennecott Copper Mines
Jack C. Boswell Engineered the development of the rich Cripple deposit and helped build the giant FE machines that were used to dig deep placer deposits. Published historian of USSR&M era.
Frederick Bradley A successful manager of the Treadwell and A-J Mines, Juneau.
Alfred H. Brooks The Chief Geologist of U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska.
John Brynteson One of Nome's 'Three Lucky Swedes' - an experienced hard-rock miner and the discoverer of the Cape Nome district.
Wallace M. Cady A USGS geologist who, with colleagues, produced The Central Kuskokwim Region, Alaska, a geological framework of a 5,000 square mile area centered on Alaska's premier mercury mining region.
Stephen R. Capps An outstanding regional geologist that specialized in the study of Alaskan placer gold deposits in glaciated areas and stood among the first to study strategic minerals in Alaska.
Ellen (Nellie) Cashman The barely five foot tall Irish immigrant Ellen (Nellie) Cashman was a quintessential gold mining stampeder who participated in many of the North American gold-silver rushes of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries.
Alexandre Choquette Discovered gold on the Stikine River which brought Americans in number into SE Alaska.
John P. Clum An Indian agent, mayor and newspaper publisher in Arizona who later traveled to Alaska to work as a Postal Inspector and established at least ten post offices in Alaska.
Earnest B. Collins Pursued a long and successful career in interior Alaska as a placer miner, a lawyer, a Alaska Territorial legislator, and a delegate at the Alaska Constitutional Convention.
Doug Colp Placer mining engineer who was active in Alaska from the end of the Alaska-Yukon Gold Rush to the end of the 20th Century. One of Alaska’s top dredging experts.
Donald Jean Cook An Oregon-born graduate of the University of Alaska, who pursued a long career, both in mining and in education.
James D. Crawford A well organized manager who acquired new dredge properties and guided the FE company into a successful post-World War II period of gold mining.
Mattie Crosby Spent nearly 50 years in the Iditarod mining district as a compassionate entrepreneur and prospector.
Jack Dalton As one of the premier horse freighters of the Alaska-Yukon Gold Rush era, Jack Dalton opened up the Dalton Trail for prospectors and traders.
James K. Davidson Designed and built the Miocene and Davidson ditch systems.
Peter Petrovich Doroshin Russian Mining Engineer who explored for minerals during the late Russian-American Period. Pioneered the geology of Alaskan coal resources. Returned to Russia and served with distinction in the Russian Mining industry.
William C. Douglass A mining engineer and an excellent manager and motivator of people who spent several years working at Kennecott, Alaska, leaving as General Superintendent of the Kennecott Copper Mine.
Wesley E. Dunkle An innovative Kennecott engineer and geologist, and the co-founder of Star Air Service, the predecessor to Alaska Airlines.
Roy B. Earling Built the pre-World War II FE Company into one of the most efficient and successful dredge mining firms in the world.
Frederick (Fred) Eastaugh Nome-born Frederick Eastaugh was an Alaskan accountant, a ship's officer for the Alaska Steamship Company, and a mining attorney who spent most of his professional career in southeast Alaska.
Herbert L. Faulkner With a law career spanning almost seventy years, Faulkner represented almost every major mining company operating in Alaska during his lifetime.
Glen DeForde Franklin A gifted athlete who studied business administration at the University of Alaska in the 1930s, and placer mined with others in both Alaska and the Yukon Territory, Canada.
Howard Franklin A Fortymile country prospector who discovered the first "bedrock" placer gold in Alaska.
Carl S. and Walter A. Glavinovich A pair of brothers who, collectively, devoted more than 100 years of their lives to the prospecting, deciphering, drilling, thawing, and dredging of the Nome, Alaska placer gold fields.
Wendell P. Hammon Installed the first of three large bucketline stacker dredges in the Cape Nome district.
Arthur Harper A well known and respected trader, prospector and promoter of the Yukon.
Richard Harris An Irish immigrant who co-discovered gold in the Juneau district.
Robert L. Hatcher Began the lode mining boom in the Willow Creek mining district with his 1906 discovery of gold-quartz veins on Skyscraper Peak in the Talkeetna Mountains, which later became part of the Independence group of mines.
Charles "Chuck" Herbert The premier Alaska miner of his generation.
Orville G. Herning Located placer claims on Willow Creek and joined with others to form the Willow Creek mining district. Later became a general store owner and important civic leader in Wasilla, Alaska.
Luther and Harriet Hess Luther was a first rate mining lawyer and an active mine developer in several interior Alaska gold camps. Harriet was a mining educator and the pioneer regent of the University of Alaska system.
Phillip R. Holdsworth Alaska's first Commissioner of Natural Resources.
Evan Jones A Welsh immigrant who became the father of Alaska coal mining.
Joe Juneau A Native of Quebec, a California 49er, and the co-discoverer of gold in the Juneau district.
Kawa.ée A Tlingit leader who brought George Pilz gold-rich rock samples from Gastineau Channel area.
Charles D. Lane A tough, honest, and wealthy miner and lawyer who helped the 'Three Luck Swedes' in their legal battles.
Erik Lindblom The eldest of the 'Three Lucky Swedes' - a tailor.
Jafet Lindeberg The Norwegian of the 'Three Lucky Swedes' - the president and manager of the very successful Pioneer Mining Company.
Robert F. Lyman An independent operator of small scale mercury lodes, but also the manager of Alaska's largest mercury mine at Red Devil on the Kuskokwim River.
Frank G. Manley A highly successful miner in the Fairbanks, Hot Springs, and Flat districts, and the founder of the First National Bank in Fairbanks.
John F. Malony, Sr. participated in southeastern Alaska mineral rushes. He helped organize and later became the President of the Alaska Electric Light and Power Company.
Merton H. Marston A newspaper editor who joined the Alaska - Yukon Gold Rush and eventually became wealthy.
Alfred Mayo 'Captain Al' - a well-known Yukon River trader and prospector.
Reuben (Fred) McClellan Organized the mining partnership that made the initial discoveries and negotiated the sales of the mineral claims that became the Kennecott mines in Alaska.
'Johnny' McGinn A smart mining lawyer who, with James Wickersham, cleaned up corruption in Nome and financed many small gold and silver projects in interior Alaska and the Yukon Territory, Canada.
Jack McQuesten Known as the 'Father of the Yukon' - a grubstaker for prospectors
Thomas Mein was born into a Scottish tenant farm community. After Mein immigrated to the United States, he sought and found a fortune in gold during the California Gold Rush and later became instrumental in the establishment of large lode gold mines near
John B. Mertie Jr. A leading U.S. Geological Survey geologist and a world expert on platinum.
Genevieve Parker Metcalfe A breakthrough woman mining engineer who developed the initial plans for FE Company's Fairbanks operations, wrote a landmark thesis on Alaska placer mining, and was a champion athlete and scholar.
John Minook A Creole-Athabascan prospector who discovered the Rampart district.
Peter Miscovich A Croatian immigrant who settled in Flat, Alaska in 1910 and pioneered the use of hydraulic mining techniques.
Andrew Olson A Swedish immigrant, an innovator at Flat and a long-time miner of platinum.
Edward Olson A placer gold miner in Iditarod district, then the general manager of The Goodnews Bay Mining Company
Lars Ostnes A Norwegian immigrant who mined in the Iditarod district and developed placer mines in remote western Alaska for over 50 years.
Earnest Patty A professor at, and later president of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, and the manager of a placer dredging venture.
Felix Pedro Discovered the Fairbanks district in 1902.
Earl R. Pilgrim Built the pre-World War II FE Company into one of the most efficient and successful dredge mining firms in the world.
George Pilz A German immigrant who sent Juneau and Harris into the Juneau area to prospect.
Chester W. Purington An acclaimed international mining engineer who wrote a treatise on Alaska placer fields.
Fannie Quigley A prospector renowned for her bush skills and a legendary Kantishna character.
Martin Radovan A Croatian prospector who prospected the Chitina Valley for decades and found the high altitude Binocular copper prospect. He never made a mine, but his dreams live on.
Irving M. Reed A Territorial Mining Engineer, the Chair of the Alaska Game Commission where he was instrumental in introducing musk oxen, bison and elk to different parts of Alaska, elected as Territorial Highway Engineer, and a fighter for Alaska statehood.
Toivo Rosander Involved in placer mining for nearly 70 years and influential in the contentious D-2 lands debate on behalf of placer mining
Joseph Rudd Shortly after Statehood, Rudd drafted the State's mining law on State lands, and was highly sought for his expertise on Natural Resource issues throughout his career. He was killed in a plane crash while returning from a trip to Juneau.
Russell Schaefer One of Alaska's 'tough guy' prospectors who accomplished much in the Kuskokwim Mercury Belt of southwest Alaska.
Arthur A. Shonbeck He joined numerous mining stampedes during the Alaska-Yukon gold rush, and became an outstanding business leader in Anchorage, Alaska, where he helped found Providence Hospital. He drowned in Ganes Creek, west of McGrath, Alaska, while on a trip with AMHF inductee John Beaton, the man who discovered Iditarod.
Walter Smith
Henry Wuya
Co-discovered platinum in the Goodnews Bay District.
Arthur C. Spencer Provided the first geologic descriptions of the Kennecott Mines in the Chitina Valley and authored a classic: USGS Bulletin 287—The Juneau Gold Belt in 1906.
Josiah E. Spurr Forged a career as a renowned economic geologist—and helped found the Society of Economic Geologists. Best known for his pre-Klondike adventure—Through the Yukon Gold Diggings.
Earl T. Stannard A mining engineer who designed innovative new ore recovery equipment and became the CEO of the Kennecott Copper Corporation.
Wise Mike Stepovich Self-educated prospector and miner from Montenegro (Yugoslavia) that mined placer and lode gold and tungsten in the Fairbanks Mining District. Patriarch of the Stepovich family in Alaska
Benjamin D. Stewart A State and Federal mining administrator and an Alaska constitutional delegate.
Norman C. Stines Planned and supervised USSR&M activities in the Fairbanks district.
Walter W. Stoll Became the general manager for Alaska Pacific Mines, Inc., operator of the Independence Gold Mine, which became the largest gold producer (in ore tonnage) in the Willow Creek mining district.
David Strandberg A Swedish immigrant who joined the Klondike gold rush in 1898 and the Iditarod rush of 1910. Built the placer mining dynasty Strandberg & Sons, Inc.
William Sulzer Bill Sulzer became a prominent New York attorney and politician, and briefly served as Governor of New York. The ever optimistic Sulzer mined copper in southeast Alaska and developed gold in the Chandalar district.
Bartlett Thane The founder and promoter of the world's largest gold mine, the Gastineau at Juneau.
Herman Tofty A Norwegian immigrant who worked prospects near Manley Hot Springs.
John Treadwell Founder of the Treadwell Mines, Juneau.
Nicholas B. and Evinda S. Tweet A husband and wife team that created a remarkably stable, family-owned company which mined gold in Alaska for 110 years.
Oscar Tweiten He arrived in Fairbanks during the Great Depression, and mined on Cleary Creek in the Fairbanks district for more than 50 years.
John Gustavus (Gus ) Uotila By 1915, Gus Uotila was known as a tough Iditarod teamster. He mentored placer mining operations throughout Alaska, and became a respected overland freighter.
Emil Usibelli Founder of the Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc., and a civic benefactor in Fairbanks.
Helen Van Campen Creative adventurer first came north during the Alaska-Yukon Gold Rush and became well known in journalism, equestrian sports, and mining. A Memorial Scholarship in Journalism at the University of Alaska bears her name.
Livingston Wernecke A geologist-engineer for the Bradley companies of Juneau.
Simon Wible He mined gold, built water canals, and became a wealthy man in California. When the gold rush began, he pioneered hydraulic mine technology on the Kenai Peninsula.
Ernest N. Wolff Public servant, and professor and administrator at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.
Kyosuke (Frank) Yasuda and Nevelo Yasuda A Japanese immigrant and his Eskimo wife, who discovered gold at Chandalar and later founded the community of Beaver.

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